Conversations on Science, Society and the Future of Gene Editing

June 4-5, 2018 / Boston, MA

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ABOUT THE EVENT

The scientific community has handed the world an incredible tool: the ability to make precise edits to the DNA in living cells. These technologies could allow us to transform our food, health and ecological systems. They also raise important questions about risks, benefits, ethics, equity and more.

CRISPRcon: Conversations on Science, Society and the Future of Gene Editing returns June 4-5, 2018 in Boston, MA to advance broad dialogue on whether and how gene editing technologies should make the transition from the lab into society at large. Please plan to join us for a dynamic, diverse and provocative lineup of panels, keynotes, interactive discussions and networking opportunities that consider gene editing across a variety of applications, disciplines, geographies, communities and cultures.

CRISPRcon will be hosted by the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT. It will be held at the Seaport Hotel and World Trade Center in Boston. CRISPRcon is a program of Keystone Policy Center. This event is being developed in partnership with the Personal Genetics Education Project of the Department of Genetics at Harvard Medical School (pgEd) and the CRISPRcon Steering Committee.

To view information from CRISPRcon 2017 in Berkeley, CA, click here.

AGENDA

This year’s program will include a dynamic lineup of panels, keynotes, interactive breakout discussions and networking opportunities that consider gene editing across a variety of applications, disciplines, geographies, communities and cultures. Additional speakers to be confirmed soon.

  • Coffee and Registration

  • Welcome and Introductions

  • Lightning Presentation

  • What’s at Stake? Diverse perspectives on the promise and perils gene editing What’s at stake in society when it comes to gene editing?  What are the potential benefits and perils of using – or not using – gene editing and what are the historical and current societal contexts through which we view them? This panel will explore multiple perspectives on the role of these technologies in agriculture, health, and conservation – and in achieving goals for a sustainable, equitable, and inclusive future.

    Melissa Buffalo
    Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health

    Melissa Buffalo

    Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health

    Jackie Leach Scully
    Policy, Ethics, and Life Sciences Institute at Newcastle University

    Jackie Leach Scully

    Policy, Ethics, and Life Sciences Institute at Newcastle University

    Ruramiso Mashumba
    Chomwedzi Farm, Zimbabwe; Mnandi Africa

    Ruramiso Mashumba

    Chomwedzi Farm, Zimbabwe; Mnandi Africa

    Kent Redford
    IUCN Task Force on Synthetic Biology and Biodiversity Conservation; Archipelago Consulting

    Kent Redford

    IUCN Task Force on Synthetic Biology and Biodiversity Conservation; Archipelago Consulting
    Moderator:

    Amy Dockser Marcus
    Wall Street Journal

    Amy Dockser Marcus

    Wall Street Journal
  • Lightning Presentation

    Omar Abudayyeh
    Broad Institute

    Omar Abudayyeh

    Broad Institute

    Jonathan Gootenber
    Broad Institute

    Jonathan Gootenber

    Broad Institute
  • Keynote Conversation with a CRISPR Scientist This interview with a leading CRISPR scientist will present some of the latest scientific developments and reflect on the role of scientists in the societal debate on gene editing.

    Feng Zhang
    Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

    Feng Zhang

    Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
    Interviewer:

    Carey Goldberg
    WBUR

    Carey Goldberg

    WBUR
  • Break

  • Lightning Presentations

    Zhanyan Fu
    Broad Institute

    Zhanyan Fu

    Broad Institute

    Joanna Buchthal
    MIT Media Lab

    Joanna Buchthal

    MIT Media Lab
  • It Takes a Village: Scientists, communities, and the co-development of ecotechnologies Engagement is often promoted as an essential component of decision-making, especially for gene editing applications that can have community-wide impacts. This panel will explore case studies of how scientists are engaging with communities around the world to inform one of the most debated areas of gene editing research: ecotechnologies, including gene drives and other technologies, that could control and even eliminate entire populations of disease-carrying and invasive species.

    Kevin Esvelt
    MIT Media Lab

    Kevin Esvelt

    MIT Media Lab

    Carrie Fyler
    Martha’s Vineyard Regional High School

    Carrie Fyler

    Martha’s Vineyard Regional High School

    Melanie Mark-Shadbolt
    Maori Biosecurity Network and Lincoln University

    Melanie Mark-Shadbolt

    Maori Biosecurity Network and Lincoln University

    Delphine Thizy
    Target Malaria

    Delphine Thizy

    Target Malaria

    Target Malaria Stakeholder

    Target Malaria Stakeholder

  • Break

  • Lightning Presentation

    Michael Gomez
    Innovative Genomics Institute

    Michael Gomez

    Innovative Genomics Institute
  • Of the people, by the people, for the people: Gene editing and technology democratization The relative ease and lower costs of new techniques have sparked visions of biotechnology democratization – with more people developing, collaborating on, and benefiting from gene editing applications to cure disease, meet consumer food demands, and more. But questions about intellectual property, safety, biosecurity, and governance remain. Using examples from health, agriculture, and the DIY community, this panel will explore the societal implications of technology democratization for what science and research get prioritized, who delivers it, how it is received or accepted, and who benefits.

    Natalie DiNicola
    Benson Hill Biosystems

    Natalie DiNicola

    Benson Hill Biosystems

    Ellen Jorgensen
    Biotech Without Borders

    Ellen Jorgensen

    Biotech Without Borders

    Joanne Kamens
    Addgene

    Joanne Kamens

    Addgene

    Luisel Ricks-Santi
    Hampton University Cancer Research Center

    Luisel Ricks-Santi

    Hampton University Cancer Research Center
    Moderator:

    Emily Mullin
    MIT Technology Review

    Emily Mullin

    MIT Technology Review
  • Lightning Presentations

  • CRISPR and the ‘Culture Creators’: The role of thought leaders, trendmakers, and trust builders in societal conversations on gene editing Public views of technology are often shaped by ‘culture creators’ and thought influencers. From community organizers and religious leaders to consumer brands and traditional journalists, how are culture creators interacting with their communities and consumers? How are they influencing and responding to societal perspectives on CRISPR in food, health, and the environment? And what lessons can we draw about the issues and outreach approaches that matter most as thought leaders engage with a diverse public on topics of gene editing?

    Shaykh Yasir Fahmy
    Islamic Society of Boston Cultural Center

    Shaykh Yasir Fahmy

    Islamic Society of Boston Cultural Center

    Florcy Romero
    Personal Genetics Education Project at Harvard University; Women of Color in Solidarity

    Florcy Romero

    Personal Genetics Education Project at Harvard University; Women of Color in Solidarity

    Dave Stangis
    Campbell Soup Company

    Dave Stangis

    Campbell Soup Company

    Sarah Zhang
    The Atlantic

    Sarah Zhang

    The Atlantic
    Moderator:

    David Sittenfeld
    Forum at Museum of Science

    David Sittenfeld

    Forum at Museum of Science
  • Day 1 Closing Remarks and Reception

  • Breakfast and Ideas Marketplace

  • Capacity Building Session: Expanding the CRISPRcon conversation

  • Welcome

  • Keynote Reflections on science and society

    Charles Mann
    Journalist and Author, 1491 and The Wizard and the Prophet

    Charles Mann

    Journalist and Author, 1491 and The Wizard and the Prophet
  • Lightning Presentations

    Andy Read
    Cornell University

    Andy Read

    Cornell University

    John Doench
    Broad Institute

    John Doench

    Broad Institute
  • Crossing Borders: International dynamics and influences on gene editing and society From biodiversity and biosecurity to agricultural trade and innovation in human gene editing, CRISPR raises important questions about the borders of biotechnology. This panel will explore examples of the challenges and opportunities in coordination, collaboration, and governance for gene editing across nations and cultures. It will consider similarities and differences in the international dynamics shaping gene editing in food, health, and conservation.

    Fan-Li Chou
    U.S. Department of Agriculture

    Fan-Li Chou

    U.S. Department of Agriculture

    Duanquing Pei
    Guangzhou Institutes of Biomedicine and Health

    Duanquing Pei

    Guangzhou Institutes of Biomedicine and Health

    Manoela Pessoa de Miranda
    Convention on Biological Diversity

    Manoela Pessoa de Miranda

    Convention on Biological Diversity
    Moderator:

    Gideon Rose
    Foreign Affairs

    Gideon Rose

    Foreign Affairs
  • Break

  • Lightning Presentation

  • Infinity and Beyond? Exploring and determining limits for gene editing How do we debate and decide upon the future of gene editing from the perspective of moral, ethical, technical, and societal ‘limits’? How do we define principles around acceptability and identify when we are comfortable with these technologies, and when it is that we go ‘too far’? What is the role of dialogue and debate, how do we make it actionable, and how can we learn from and connect the debates happening within multiple sectors?

    George Church
    Wyss Institute at Harvard Medical School

    George Church

    Wyss Institute at Harvard Medical School

    Reverend Kevin FitzGerald
    Georgetown University

    Reverend Kevin FitzGerald

    Georgetown University

    Randy Spronk
    Spronk Brothers and Ranger Farms

    Randy Spronk

    Spronk Brothers and Ranger Farms
    Moderator:

    Tamar Haspel
    Washington Post

    Tamar Haspel

    Washington Post
  • Adjourn

REGISTER

LOCATION

CRISPRcon 2018 is being held at the Seaport Hotel and World Trade Center in Boston, MA. We recommend that those attending CRISPRcon 2018 make their travel arrangements, including reserving lodging, as soon as possible as June is a busy time in Boston.

STEERING COMMITTEE

Mark Cigna, Genus

Sarah Davidson Evanega, Cornell Alliance for Science

Jennifer Doudna, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and University of California Berkeley

Cassie Edgar, McKee, Voorhees & Seasa, PLC

Bill Even, National Pork Board

Michael Fernandez, George Washington University Sustainability Collaborative

Michael Friend, Minority Coalition for Precision Medicine

Marnie Gelbart, Personal Genetics Education Project, Harvard Medical School

J. Keith Gilles, University of California Berkeley, College of Natural Resources

Neal Gutterson, Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDupont

Rachel Haurwitz, Caribou Bioscience

Tim Hunt, Editas Medicine

Greg Jaffe, Center for Science in the Public Interest

Susan Jenkins, Innovative Genomics Institute

Tammy Lee Stanoch, Recombinetics

Lee McGuire, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Andrew Michael, Centura Health

Jeff Moen, Noble Research Institute, LLC

Julie Pryor, McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT

Sesquile Ramon, Biotechnology Innovation Organization

Rebecca Shaw, World Wildlife Fund

 

CRISPRcon will be hosted by the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT.

This event is being developed by Keystone Policy Center in partnership with the Personal Genetics Education Project of the Department of Genetics at Harvard Medical School and the CRISPRcon Steering committee. Special thanks to Johnny Kung and Florcy Romero of pgED.

SPONSORS

Sponsorship opportunities still available. For more information contact@crisprcon.org

CRISPRcon is a program of Keystone Policy Center. Keystone is a nationally recognized nonprofit working to bring diverse perspectives to bear in helping leaders, stakeholders, and communities reach common higher ground on society’s most challenging issues. Keystone manages overall development of CRISPRcon programming, planning, and fundraising. Keystone operates under a statement of independence to serve all of its project participants and does not take a position of advocacy on any specific or general use of CRISPR and other gene-editing technologies.

For more information about CRISPRcon, contact us below:

CONTACT