Science, Society, and the Future of Gene Editing

August 16, 1:00 PM – August 17, 4:30 PM
Stanley Hall, University of California, Berkeley

SOLD OUT

ABOUT THE EVENT

This event is now sold out. Thank you for your interest in CRISPRcon. We look forward to seeing you there!

We’ll be livestreaming three sessions from CRISPRcon at twitter.com/crisprcon. More details in the schedule below.

The scientific community has handed the world an incredible tool: the ability to make precise changes to the DNA in living cells, which could allow us to eradicate diseases, transform the farming and agriculture industries, and enable massive leaps forward in environmental and life science. That is the promise of CRISPR and other technologies that allow scientists to make precise edits to genomes.

But the science behind CRISPR is just one piece of the puzzle. Now is the time to hear the voices of people whose lives could be impacted by this powerful technology: patients, doctors, farmers, consumers, nonprofit leaders, environmentalists, and other interested parties. From human and animal health to the future of the food chain, these stakeholders will play a critical role in assessing the potential of CRISPR to make the transition from the lab to the outside world.

Hosted at the University of California, Berkeley, the mission of CRISPRcon is to bring together a broad selection of diverse voices to discuss the future of this groundbreaking technology across all applications. Through keynotes, panels, interactive discussions, and networking opportunities, CRISPRcon will create a unique forum in which everyone with a stake in CRISPR can share their ideas, ask and answer questions, and make sure that their voices are heard.

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

This one-and-a-half-day event will explore the intersection of science, society, and the future of gene editing. The program will include keynote addresses, panel discussions, interactive audience polling, and opportunities for networking and discussion among a diverse set of voices. CRISPRcon will explore topics including:

Engaging the public in conversations about CRISPR

Social dimensions of CRISPR in medicine, food, and conservation

The role of regulation and social acceptance in determining the future of CRISPR

SCHEDULE

Draft Schedule (subject to change)

  • Registration and networking

  • Welcome and introduction

    Emcee:

    Michael Krasny

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    Michael Krasny

    Host, KQED FORUM, Professor of English, San Francisco State University

    Dr. Krasny is host of the award winning KQED FORUM, a program discussing news and public affairs, current events, culture, health, business and technology. FORUM can be heard daily on Northern California’s public radio station, KQED, as well as on Sirius/XM Satellite with National Public Radio, Comcast digital cable, and on the Internet as a podcast on iTunes. He has interviewed a wide range of major political and cultural figures. He is also a veteran interviewer for the nationally broadcast City Arts and Lectures series. Focus Magazine named him Best Bay Area Talk Show Host, and he was selected Best Talk Host and Best Interviewer by the editorial staff of San Francisco Weekly, as well as in their annual reader’s poll.

    Dr. Krasny’s abilities and reputation as one of the world’s finest interviewers are enhanced by his creative work as an author and educator. A former regular contributor to Mother Jones magazine, Dr. Krasny has published a great deal of fiction, literary criticism and political commentary. He is the author of Off Mike: A Memoir of Talk Radio and Literary Life (Stanford University Press) which was on both The San Francisco Chronicle and The Marin Independent Journal best-seller lists, Sound Ideas (with Maggie Sokolik McGraw-Hill) and Let There Be Laughter (Harper Collins). He also released a twenty-four lecture series DVD, audio and book on “Short Story Masterpieces” for The Teaching Company, and is the author of Spiritual Envy (New World Press), which was also on the best-seller lists in The San Francisco Chronicle and the Marin Independent Journal.

    A professor of English at San Francisco State University, he has been Visiting Professor at the University of San Francisco, Adjunct Professor at the University of California San Francisco and taught in Continuing Education at Stanford University, as well as being an Associate of the San Francisco Urban Institute. He coordinated the Nexa Dissemination Program in Science and Humanities under the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Carnegie Foundation, taught in the Fulbright Institutes for the National Fulbright Foundation, moderated the Future Forum on Global Impacts of Human Activity at the University of California, and was a Gelenter Lecturer at the University of California, San Francisco Department of Surgery. Michael conducted seminars at Esalen Institute, lectured to the San Francisco Psychoanalytic Institute and aboard the Royal Odyssey Cruise Line. In 2007, he was honored with an Award of Excellence from the National Association of Humanities Educators.

  • Taking the Debate from the Lab to the Living Room: Reflections from a CRISPR researcher on the social dimensions of the science With CRISPR, a hypothesis that originated in the lab is driving debate throughout society. As this debate evolves, scientists are key partners and thought leaders in helping the world understand the technology and its potential applications – and in shaping the scientific community’s deliberations over how societal values should inform future investigations. In this session, a pioneer in CRISPR research will reflect on her journey from scientific discovery to discourse on the promise and perils of gene editing with stakeholders worldwide.

    This session will be livestreamed. Tune in via Twitter.

    Jennifer Doudna

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    Jennifer Doudna, Ph.D.

    Professor of Chemistry and of Molecular and Cell Biology, UC Berkeley and Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

    Jennifer Doudna is the Li Ka Shing Chancellor’s Chair in Biomedical and Health Sciences and she is Professor of Molecular and Cell Biology and Professor of Chemistry at UC Berkeley and an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.  Prof. Doudna’s research seeks to understand how RNA molecules control the expression of genetic information. Her research led to insights about CRISPR-Cas9-mediated bacterial immunity that enabled her lab and that of collaborator Emmanuellef Charpentier to re-design this system for efficient genome engineering in animals and plants, creating a transformative technology that is revolutionizing the fields of genetics, molecular biology and medicine. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine and the National Academy of Inventors. She is a recipient of awards including the NSF Waterman Award, the FNIH Lurie Prize, the Paul Janssen Award for Biomedical Research, the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences, the Princess of Asturias Award (Spain), the Gruber Prize in Genetics, the Massry Prize, the Gairdner Award, the Nakasone Prize, the Tang Prize, the Heineken Prize and the L’Oreal-UNESCO International Prize for Women in Science.

  • Envisioning the Future: Where might CRISPR take us – and do we want to go there? Across the world, CRISPR’s potential is being explored at a breathtaking pace. The resulting real-world gene editing applications could end up in our hospitals, grocery stores and ecosystems in under a decade. This panel will consider hopes and fears as we contemplate the future of CRISPR.

    Marcy Darnovsky

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    Marcy Darnovsky, PhD

    Executive Director, Center for Genetics and Society

    Marcy Darnovsky, PhD, is Executive Director at the Center for Genetics and Society, a Berkeley, California-based social justice organization that works to ensure an equitable future in which human genetic and assisted reproductive technologies benefit the common good. She speaks and writes widely on human biotechnologies, focusing on their social justice, equity, human rights, and public interest implications.

    Eri Gentry

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    Eri Gentry

    Research Manager at Institute for the Future, Cofounder of BioCurious

    Eri is a science and technology researcher at the Institute for the Future, a Palo Alto-based futures research organization, where she helps organizations navigate the zones between technology disruption and user adoption. Eri is co-founder and chairperson of BioCurious, the world’s first hackerspace for biology, named one of FastCompany’s Top Ten Most Innovative Companies in Education. She is passionate about the democratization and human-centricity of science and medicine. She has been named a Champion for Change in Citizen Science by the White House, a Hometown Hero by Popular Mechanics, a Techonomy Top Ten – edging out additive manufacturing – and co-authored the book Maker Pro.

    Pastor Michael McBride

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    Pastor Michael McBride

    Pastor Michael McBride (known as “Pastor Mike”) is a native of San Francisco and has been active in ministry for over 20 years. Throughout the years, Pastor McBride’s commitment to holistic ministry can be seen through his leadership roles in both the church and community organizations.  A graduate of Duke University’s Divinity School, with a Master of Divinity with an emphasis in Ethics and Public Policy, Pastor McBride launched The Way Christian Center in West Berkeley, where he presently serves as the Lead Pastor. In March 2012, he became the Director for the Lifelines to Healing/LIVE FREE Campaign with the PICO National Network, a campaign led by hundreds of faith congregations throughout the United States committed to addressing gun violence and mass incarceration of young people of color. In 2013, Pastor McBride was selected as the #9 Top Clergy Leader to Watch in the US by the Center for American Progress.  He has served on a number of local and national task forces with the White House and Department of Justice regarding gun violence prevention, boys and men of color and police-community relationships.  He was recently appointed as an Advisor on President Obama’s Faith Based Advisory Council for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships.  He is a regular guest on MSNBC, CNN and Al-Jazeera programs providing commentary for issues related to faith and racial justice.  He is married to Cherise McBride and they have two beautiful daughters, Sarai and Nylah.

    Ted Nordhaus

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    Ted Nordhaus

    Cofounder and Research Director, The Breakthrough Institute, Co-author An Ecomodernist Manifesto

    Ted Nordhaus is a leading global thinker on energy, environment, climate, human development, and politics. He is the co-founder and executive director of the Breakthrough Institute and a co-author of “An Ecomodernist Manifesto.”

    Over the last decade, he has helped lead a paradigm shift in climate, energy, and environmental policy. He was among the first to emphasize the imperative to “make clean energy cheap” in The Harvard Law and Policy Review, explained why efforts to establish legally binding international limits on greenhouse gas emissions would fail in the Washington Post and Democracy Journal, made the case for nuclear energy as a critical global warming solution in the Wall Street Journal, has written on the limits to energy efficiency and the need to prepare for climate change in the New York Times, and has argued for the importance of intensifying agricultural production in order to spare land for forests and biodiversity in Scientific American and the Guardian.

    His 2007 book Break Through, co-authored with Michael Shellenberger, was called “prescient” by Time and “the best thing to happen to environmentalism since Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring” by Wired. (An excerpt in The New Republic can be read here.) Their 2004 essay, “The Death of Environmentalism,” was featured on the front page of the Sunday New York Times, sparked a national debate, and inspired a generation of young environmentalists.

    Over the years, Nordhaus been profiled in the New York TimesWired, the San Francisco Chronicle, the National ReviewThe New Republic, and on NPR.  In 2007, he received the Green Book Award and Time magazine’s 2008 “Heroes of the Environment” award.

    Nordhaus is executive editor of the Breakthrough Journal, which The New Republic called “among the most complete efforts to provide a fresh answer” to the question of how to modernize liberal thought, and the National Review called “The most promising effort at self-criticism by our liberal cousins in a long time.”

    Thomas Titus

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    Thomas Titus

    Thomas Titus was raised on a grain and livestock farm in East Central Illinois prior to attending the University of Illinois and attaining a degree in Education and Animal Sciences. Seeking to continue his education within the agricultural industry sought out to partner with a company that focused upon development while providing key learning and career opportunities. Working for Cargill for nearly 6 years allowed Thomas to develop a greater business acumen while still being able to maintain his passion for the pork industry working  within Cargill’s Pork Business Unit. Today this experience has been proven pivotal as a grain and livestock farmer with his wife, Breann Conrady-Titus’, family in Elkhart Illinois. On Thomas’ multigenerational family farm he raises corn, soybeans and pigs, however the most important thing raised is his family on the farm. The opportunity to continue the legacy of the farm within the next generation is Thomas’ ultimate goal and reward. Thomas spends a great deal of time focusing on consumer outreach. As past Face of Farming and Ranching for the US Farmers and Ranchers Alliance, Thomas spends time sharing his farms stories using social media and attending more consumer driven events to help rebuild the relationship with the American farmer and maintain trust in the food system.

    Moderator:

    Jennifer Kahn

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    Jennifer Kahn

    Contributing Writer, New York Times Magazine. Senior Lecturer, UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism.

    Jennifer Kahn is a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine, and has been a regular feature writer for The New Yorker, National Geographic, Wired, and Outside, among others. Her work has been selected for the Best American Science Writing series four times. Since 2009, she has taught in the Magazine Program at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, and was a visiting Ferris Professor of Journalism at Princeton in 2015. Her 2016 TED talk on CRISPR and gene drives has been viewed more than 1.4 million times, and was named one of the top TED talks of 2016 by conference organizers.

  • Break

  • CRISPR in the Public Eye: Societal perceptions of science How does the public engage with, view, value and trust scientific innovation? What can we learn from the acceptance or rejection of past innovations to inform the kinds of public conversations on science and values that need to be undertaken in the future? This panel will bring together experts in science communications to reflect on societal perceptions of science and their implications for CRISPR.

    Roxi Beck

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    Roxi Beck

    Consumer Engagement Director, The Center for Food Integrity, Vice President, Look East Consulting

    As consumer engagement director for The Center for Food Integrity and vice president at Look East Consulting, Roxi Beck brings nearly 15 years’ experience working with clients across the food system. Whether toxicologists, registered dietitians, researchers, brand executives, farmers, marketing teams or non-profits, she shares research learnings, helps industry stakeholders understand how to be transparent and build consumer trust and develops and implemements digital, stakeholder engagement and organizational strategies. Away from the office, you’ll likely find her teaching her kids to rollerblade, pulling weeds in her sub-par garden or avoiding answering “what’s for dinner?”

    Rick Loverd

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    Rick Loverd

    Program Director, The Science & Entertainment Exchange, National Academy of Sciences

    Rick Loverd is the director of The Science & Entertainment Exchange, a program of the National Academy of Sciences. The program’s mission is to connect scientists, engineers and doctors with Hollywood writers, producers, directors and actors with the view of helping to ensure accurate portrayal of science in film, on television and in other entertainment outlets. Launched in November 2008, the Exchange has helped filmmakers on about 700 films and television programs, including Iron Man 2, Thor, Tron: Legacy, The Avengers, Star Trek: Into the Darkness, Lost, Fringe, Green Lantern, Castle, Bourne: Legacy, The Good Wife and Captain America: The Winter Soldier. In addition to his work with The Exchange, Rick also has eight years of entertainment industry experience including positions on the television series Friday Night Lights on NBC and Boston Public on FOX, and at talent agency Creative Artists Agency.

    Michael Specter

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    Michael Specter

    Michael Specter has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1998, and has written frequently about AIDS, T.B., and malaria in the developing world, as well as about agricultural biotechnology, avian influenza, the world’s diminishing freshwater resources, and synthetic biology. His Profile subjects have included Dr. Oz, Peter Singer, Larry Kramer, and Richard Branson, along with Sean (P. Diddy) Combs, Manolo Blahnik, and Miuccia Prada. Previously, he worked at the New York_ Times_ as its senior foreign correspondent, based in Rome; from 1995 to 1998, he served as the paper’s Moscow bureau chief. Before joining the Times, he served as the_ _Washington Post’s national science reporter and, later, as its New York bureau chief. In 1996, he received an Overseas Press Club citation for his reporting on the war in Chechnya. He has twice received the Global Health Council’s annual Excellence in Media Award: in 2002, for “India’s Plague,” and  in 2005, for “The Devastation,” about the ethics of testing H.I.V. vaccines in Africa. His article “Rethinking the Brain” received the 2002 AAAS Science Journalism Award. He is the author of “Denialism: How Irrational Thinking Hinders Scientific Progress, Harms the Planet, and Threatens Our Lives,” which, in 2010, received the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry’s Robert P. Balles Annual Prize in Critical Thinking. His piece “Against the Grain” won a 2015 James Beard Award in the Food and Health category.

    Ting Wu

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    Ting Wu, PhD

    Professor of Genetics, Director, Consortium Space Genetics, Director, Personal Genetics Education Project, Harvard Medical School

    Ting (C.-ting) Wu, Ph.D., is a Professor of Genetics, Director of the Consortium for Space Genetics, and Director of the Personal Genetics Education Project (pgEd.org) at Harvard Medical School. Research-wise, her laboratory investigates how the organization of chromosomes within the cell can influence inheritance and genome function, uses computational tools to explore the potential of highly conserved sequences to protect genome integrity, and invents technologies for imaging the genome. The Wu laboratory also houses pgEd, which promotes public awareness and dialog about personal genetics, aiming to make engagement equal across all communities, regardless of socioeconomic, ethnic, educational, and religious influences. pgEd works in classrooms, provides curricula and teacher training, runs Congressional briefings, advises the film and television industry, and partners with communities of faith.

    Moderator:

    Sarah Davidson Evanega

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    Sarah Davidson Evanega, PhD

    Sr. Associate Director, International Programs CALS, Director, Cornell Alliance for Science

    Sarah received her PhD in the field of Plant Biology from Cornell University in 2009, for which she conducted an interdisciplinary study combining work in plant molecular biology with science communication.  Her dissertation focused on the controversy over genetically engineered papaya in developing countries with a specific focus on Thailand. Sarah now serves as the Director for the Cornell Alliance for Science—a global communications effort that promotes evidence-based decision-making in agriculture.  She teaches courses on agricultural biotechnology at the graduate and undergraduate level and is part of an interdisciplinary team that recently launched a massive open online course (MOOC) on the science and politics of GMOs on Cornell’s EdX platform.  Sarah serves as Senior Associate Director of International Programs in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and holds an adjunct appointment in the Section of Plant Breeding & Genetics in the School of Integrative Plant Sciences at Cornell. Sarah was instrumental in launching the CALS initiative, AWARE (Advancing Women in Agriculture through Research and Education) which promotes women in agriculture.  Sarah earned her BA in Biology at Reed College in Portland, Oregon and grew up in a small agricultural village in northwest Illinois.

  • Battle of the Bans: AI, CRISPR & Human Chips: Setting Limits in a Limitless Future
    This session will be livestreamed. Tune in via Twitter.

    Greg Simon

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    Greg Simon

    President of the Biden Cancer Initiative

    Greg Simon is the President of the Biden Cancer Initiative, a nonprofit based in Washington, DC.. He previously served as the Executive Director of the White House Cancer Moonshot Task Force, a position created by President Barack Obama and for which he was chosen by Vice President Joe Biden in March 2016.  Over nine months, Greg and his team helped launch over seventy innovative collaborations.  Greg returned to the White House after serving as Vice President Al Gore’s Chief Domestic Policy Advisor between 1993 and 1997.  He was the CEO of Poliwogg, a financial services company creating unique capital market opportunities in healthcare and life sciences.  Previously, Greg was Senior Vice President for Worldwide Policy and Patient Engagement at Pfizer, co-founded with Michael Milken, FasterCures/ The Center for Accelerating Medical solutions, and with Leon and Debra Black co-founded the Melanoma Research Alliance.  Greg is a cancer survivor, having been recently successfully treated for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Moderator:

    Michael Krasny

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    Michael Krasny

    Host, KQED FORUM, Professor of English, San Francisco State University

    Dr. Krasny is host of the award winning KQED FORUM, a program discussing news and public affairs, current events, culture, health, business and technology. FORUM can be heard daily on Northern California’s public radio station, KQED, as well as on Sirius/XM Satellite with National Public Radio, Comcast digital cable, and on the Internet as a podcast on iTunes. He has interviewed a wide range of major political and cultural figures. He is also a veteran interviewer for the nationally broadcast City Arts and Lectures series. Focus Magazine named him Best Bay Area Talk Show Host, and he was selected Best Talk Host and Best Interviewer by the editorial staff of San Francisco Weekly, as well as in their annual reader’s poll.

    Dr. Krasny’s abilities and reputation as one of the world’s finest interviewers are enhanced by his creative work as an author and educator. A former regular contributor to Mother Jones magazine, Dr. Krasny has published a great deal of fiction, literary criticism and political commentary. He is the author of Off Mike: A Memoir of Talk Radio and Literary Life (Stanford University Press) which was on both The San Francisco Chronicle and The Marin Independent Journal best-seller lists, Sound Ideas (with Maggie Sokolik McGraw-Hill) and Let There Be Laughter (Harper Collins). He also released a twenty-four lecture series DVD, audio and book on “Short Story Masterpieces” for The Teaching Company, and is the author of Spiritual Envy (New World Press), which was also on the best-seller lists in The San Francisco Chronicle and the Marin Independent Journal.

    A professor of English at San Francisco State University, he has been Visiting Professor at the University of San Francisco, Adjunct Professor at the University of California San Francisco and taught in Continuing Education at Stanford University, as well as being an Associate of the San Francisco Urban Institute. He coordinated the Nexa Dissemination Program in Science and Humanities under the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Carnegie Foundation, taught in the Fulbright Institutes for the National Fulbright Foundation, moderated the Future Forum on Global Impacts of Human Activity at the University of California, and was a Gelenter Lecturer at the University of California, San Francisco Department of Surgery. Michael conducted seminars at Esalen Institute, lectured to the San Francisco Psychoanalytic Institute and aboard the Royal Odyssey Cruise Line. In 2007, he was honored with an Award of Excellence from the National Association of Humanities Educators.

  • Reception and Ideas Marketplace

  • Breakfast

  • Optional Breakout Session: Intergenerational engagement on gene-editing technologies Whether on human gene editing, gene drives, biosecurity or food security, the decisions made now regarding CRISPR and its applications will have consequences for today’s children and generations to come. Yet these next generation stakeholders are rarely involved in the discussions that will shape their futures. This facilitated dialogue will explore pathways for better involving multiple generations in future dialogue and discussion on CRISPR.

    Hosted by the UN Major Group for Children and Youth

  • Welcome

    Emcee:

    Michael Krasny

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    Michael Krasny

    Host, KQED FORUM, Professor of English, San Francisco State University

    Dr. Krasny is host of the award winning KQED FORUM, a program discussing news and public affairs, current events, culture, health, business and technology. FORUM can be heard daily on Northern California’s public radio station, KQED, as well as on Sirius/XM Satellite with National Public Radio, Comcast digital cable, and on the Internet as a podcast on iTunes. He has interviewed a wide range of major political and cultural figures. He is also a veteran interviewer for the nationally broadcast City Arts and Lectures series. Focus Magazine named him Best Bay Area Talk Show Host, and he was selected Best Talk Host and Best Interviewer by the editorial staff of San Francisco Weekly, as well as in their annual reader’s poll.

    Dr. Krasny’s abilities and reputation as one of the world’s finest interviewers are enhanced by his creative work as an author and educator. A former regular contributor to Mother Jones magazine, Dr. Krasny has published a great deal of fiction, literary criticism and political commentary. He is the author of Off Mike: A Memoir of Talk Radio and Literary Life (Stanford University Press) which was on both The San Francisco Chronicle and The Marin Independent Journal best-seller lists, Sound Ideas (with Maggie Sokolik McGraw-Hill) and Let There Be Laughter (Harper Collins). He also released a twenty-four lecture series DVD, audio and book on “Short Story Masterpieces” for The Teaching Company, and is the author of Spiritual Envy (New World Press), which was also on the best-seller lists in The San Francisco Chronicle and the Marin Independent Journal.

    A professor of English at San Francisco State University, he has been Visiting Professor at the University of San Francisco, Adjunct Professor at the University of California San Francisco and taught in Continuing Education at Stanford University, as well as being an Associate of the San Francisco Urban Institute. He coordinated the Nexa Dissemination Program in Science and Humanities under the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Carnegie Foundation, taught in the Fulbright Institutes for the National Fulbright Foundation, moderated the Future Forum on Global Impacts of Human Activity at the University of California, and was a Gelenter Lecturer at the University of California, San Francisco Department of Surgery. Michael conducted seminars at Esalen Institute, lectured to the San Francisco Psychoanalytic Institute and aboard the Royal Odyssey Cruise Line. In 2007, he was honored with an Award of Excellence from the National Association of Humanities Educators.

  • Genome Surgery: CRISPR cures, community perceptions and questions of equity Gene editing offers the potential to find therapies for life threatening and/or debilitating human genetic diseases – from cardiac and neurological diseases to Huntington’s disease and sickle cell anemia. Yet human gene editing raises many questions related to bioethics and equity: Who can access these therapies? How is personal choice given a fair voice? Where do we draw the line between a cure and an enhancement? Who funds a cure? And, how far do we go in treating disease through germline editing?

    Shakir Cannon

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    Shakir Cannon

    Co-Founder, Minority Coalition for Precision Medicine

    Shakir Cannon is a Civic Health Leader and Co-Founder of the Minority Coalition for Precision Medicine (MCPM), an emerging organization dedicated to the disbursement of health information literacy through a parallel education and awareness strategy performed within minority populated regions as determined by US Census data. Shakir is also an internationally recognized Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) patient and advocate who helps educate & spread awareness for SCD both as a public speaker and social media thought leader. Throughout his lifelong battle with the often debilitating and at times devastating disease, Shakir learned how crucial it is to remain educated and informed of the ever-evolving healthcare system. When President Obama released the Precision Medicine Initiative in 2015, Shakir became fascinated about learning of this exciting opportunity to, as put by the former President, “accelerate the process of discovering cures in ways that we’ve never seen before”. In November 2015, Shakir along with his business partner, Michael Friend, hosted a two-day event in Baltimore Maryland entitled “Sickle Cell Disease and Precision Medicine” to highlight sickle cell disease as one of our nation’s biggest health disparities while also beginning discussions on how future precision medicine practices could potentially provide much needed hope for those who suffer from the inherited biomolecular illness. Representatives from the many governing health agencies were present, including Dr. Jo Handelsman the then Associate Director of The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, who provided the Keynote Speech for this rather historic event. Shortly thereafter Shakir was invited to The White House for the Precision Medicine Summit of 2016 as the Minority Coalition for Precision Medicine was listed on The White House fact sheet for their community outreach, along with their sister organization, The Health Ministries Network (HMN), and collaborators The BioCollective. Shakir truly believes that through genomic medicine and upcoming genetic technologies, hereditary illnesses like sickle cell disease will one day be more effectively treated if not cured. Shakir’s lifelong mission is to achieve health equity for ethnically diverse populations throughout the United States.

    Bruce Conklin

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    Bruce R. Conklin, MD

    Gladstone Scientific Officer, Research Technology & Innovation; Senior Investigator, Gladstone; Professor, UCSF Departments of Medicine and Ophthalmology

    Deputy Director, Innovative Genomics Institute

    Dr. Conklin’s research focuses on genome engineering to identify novel therapeutic approaches to human disease.  By making precise genetic changes in induced pluripotent cells he seeks to reveal the cellular and molecular mechanisms of disease and identify new methods for therapeutic editing. He began his research career by working for two years at NIH with Julius Axelrod, Ph.D., (Nobel Laureate). He then completed his residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital and a postdoctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Henry Bourne, M.D. at UCSF. In 1995 Dr. Conklin joined the Gladstone Institutes and the UCSF faculty where he is now a Senior Investigator at Gladstone, and a Professor at UCSF. Dr. Conklin is also the Gladstone Scientific Officer for Technology & Innovation and the deputy director of the Innovative Genomics Institute. He is the founder BayGenomics, GenMAPP, AltAnalyze and WikiPathways.  He pioneered the field of chemogenetics using designer GPCRs (RASSLs). He founded the Gladstone Genomics and Stem Cell Cores.  He advises multiple organizations including the Allen Institute for Cell Science, Chinese University of Hong Kong, and the SF Exploratorium. He is a Fellow in the California Academy of Sciences and a member the American Society for Clinical Investigation.

    Rosemarie Garland-Thomson

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    Rosemarie Garland-Thomson

    Professor of English and bioethics, Co-Director, Disability Studies Initiative, Emory University

    Rosemarie Garland-Thomson is Professor of English at Emory University, where her fields of study are disability studies, American literature and culture, bioethics, and feminist theory. Her work develops the field of critical disability studies in the health humanities, broadly understood, to bring forward disability access, inclusion, and identity to communities inside and outside of the academy. She is the author of Staring: How We Look and several other books. Her current book project is Habitable Worlds: Toward a Disability Bioethics.

    Osagie Obasogie

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    Osagie K. Obasogie, J.D., Ph.D.

    Haas Distinguished Chair, Professor of Bioethics, University of California, Berkeley, Joint Medical Program, School of Public Health

    Osagie K. Obasogie, J.D., Ph.D., is Haas Distinguished Chair and Professor of Bioethics at the University of California, Berkeley, in the Joint Medical Program and School of Public Health. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Center for Genetics and Society. Obasogie’s scholarly interests include the sociology of law and medicine, bioethics, racial disparities in health and social outcomes, and reproductive and genetic technologies. His writings have spanned both academic and public audiences, with journal articles in venues such as the Law & Society Review and the Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics along with commentaries in outlets such as the New York Times, Slate, The Atlantic, and Scientific American. His first book, “Blinded By Sight: Seeing Race Through the Eyes of the Blind,” was published by Stanford University Press and his second book (with Marcy Darnovsky) on the past, present, and future of bioethics is under contract with the University of California Press.

    Mark Walters

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    Mark C. Walters, MD

    Jordan Family Director, Blood and Marrow Transplant Program
    UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital, Oakland

    Mark C. Walters, MD, is the Jordan Family Director of the Blood and Marrow Transplantation Program at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital, Oakland.  Dr. Walters received his A.B. with honors in Genetics from the University of California, Berkeley and his MD from the University of California, San Diego. He completed pediatric residency training at the University of Washington and hematology/oncology fellowship training at the University of Washington and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle.  He was a junior faculty member in Seattle before matriculating to Oakland in 1999.  He has been active in cooperative clinical transplantation trials and has led several NIH-supported investigations of hematopoietic cell transplantation for sickle cell anemia and thalassemia.  He has authored or co-authored many publications with a focus on hematopoietic cell transplantation for hemoglobin disorders, and he has a research interest in extending transplantation to young adults with hemoglobin disorders and other novel cellular therapies for hemoglobin disorders.  Currently, research interests are focused on genomic editing and gene addition therapies as a strategy to extend curative therapy in all patients who inherit a clinically significant hemoglobinopathy.

    Moderator:

    Lorez Meinhold

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    Lorez Meinhold

    Senior Policy Director, Keystone Policy Center

    Lorez brings over seventeen years of health care policy experience as a director of multi-lateral initiatives involving the public, private and civic sectors, working at the local, state, and national levels. Lorez has worked in many capacities implementing and integrating health programs. Lorez has worked across a variety of health topics including: aging and disability, early childhood development, maternal and child health, 2Gen/ multigenerational, health equity, mental health and substance abuse, supported employment for people with disabilities, and social determinants. Prior to joining Keystone Policy Center, Lorez has worked for two administrations in Colorado, in the Department of Health Care Policy and Financing, and for non-profit organizations.

  • If We Edit It, Will We Eat It?: Social acceptance of CRISPR in food Researchers are exploring the potential of CRISPR to shape food production for numerous objectives such as eliminating croppests, improving animal welfare, enhancing nutrition, increasing yields and improving sustainability. This research is underway in the context of growing populations, shifting diets and limited natural resources, as well as increasing consumer interest in food governance, transparency, quality, animal health and environmental impacts. This panel will discuss the values surrounding gene-edited food and social acceptance.

    Cassie Edgar

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    Cassie Edgar

    Chief IP & Regulatory Officer, Genus plc

    Cassie Edgar’s career has been focused on creative collaboration at the intersection of biotechnology and law. In her current role, she is leading the intellectual property and regulatory teams for Genus plc, a publicly traded global company actively engaged in gene editing using CRISPR technology. Cassie joined Genus in September 2014 from Pioneer DuPont, where she served for 14 years in research, legal and management roles including IP Counsel, Sr. Regulatory Counsel, and Director in the Agricultural Biotechnology group.  She holds a B.S. in Molecular Genetics from The Ohio State University, a M.S. from North Carolina State University, obtained her law degree from Drake University, and completed the General Management Program at Harvard Business School.

    Dana Perls

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    Dana Perls

    Senior Food and Technology Campaigner, Friends of the Earth

    Dana Perls is senior food and technology campaigner with Friends of the Earth-U.S. Friends of the Earth is the North American representative to Friends of the Earth International, the world’s largest grassroots federation of environmental organizations. Dana leads Friends of the Earth’s market and policy work on the environmental impacts of emerging technologies such as genetic engineering and synthetic biology. Dana brings a strong background in public advocacy and environmental policy and combines them with her commitment to environmental justice. She holds a Masters in City Planning from UC Berkeley in CA, and a B.A. from Cornell University.

    Paul Shapiro

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    Paul Shapiro

    Vice President of Policy, The Humane Society of the United States

    Paul Shapiro is the vice president of policy at The Humane Society of the United States, the largest animal welfare organization in the world. He’s also the author of a forthcoming book on the promise of biotechnology in the food and agriculture sector. He’s been interviewed in hundreds of media outlets and has published dozens of articles about animal protection in publications ranging from daily newspapers to academic journals.

    Tom Willey

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    Tom Willey

    Owner, T&D Willey Farms

    Tom Willey, with his wife Denesse, operated T&D Willey Farms from 1981 until 2016, a seventy-five-acre Certified Organic farm in Madera, California, growing a wide array of Mediterranean vegetables the year round. T&D Willey Farms produce was appreciated in specialty markets and fine restaurants up and down the U.S.West Coast as well as on the tables of over 800 weekly Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) subscription members in their own community. Tom was, for nearly a decade, Slow Food USA’s governor for California’s Central Valley and he passionately advocates for local food prominence through his writing, speaking, radio and event organizing activities. His monthly “Down on the Farm” radio interview program features the work of progressive farmers and others prominent in San Joaquin Valley’s agriculture and food communities.

    Tom has served over the years on the boards of directors of the Ecological Farming Association (EFA) and California Certified Organic Farmers (CCOF). He currently serves as a Policy Advisor to The Cornucopia Institute which monitors integrity of the U.S. organic industry.

    Randal Giroux

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    Randal Giroux, PhD

    Vice President, Cargill Incorporated

    Randal Giroux currently holds the position of Vice President at Cargill Incorporated located at the World Headquarters in Wayzata, Minnesota. Randal currently leads Food Safety and Quality for Cargill’s Global Poultry businesses and previous to this appointment, he held a similar role for Cargill’s Global Agricultural Supply Chain businesses. Dr. Giroux is a recognized thought leader in the integration of agricultural biotechnology into the global food system and involved professionally in both national and international trade organizations. He has held a number of biotechnology leadership positions in trade associations and served on several biotechnology advisory committees. Before joining Cargill, Dr. Giroux was a Program Manager with the Canadian Grain Commission and previous to his public service, he was a National Needs Fellow with USDA-ARS. Randal graduated with a PhD in Agriculture from the University of Guelph (OAC).

    Moderator:

    Michael Fernandez

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    Michael Fernandez

    Senior Fellow, George Washington University Sustainability Collaborative

    Michael Fernandez is Senior Fellow at the GW Sustainability Collaborative and Professorial Lecturer at the Milken Institute School of Public Health, where his work focuses on food, agriculture and environmental policy. He was most recently Senior Director of Global Public Policy for Mars, Incorporated, where he was responsible for developing and managing global public policies across the company’s portfolio. Michael joined Mars in 2008 from the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology, where he served first as Director of Science and then as Executive Director. Previous work includes Associate Administrator for the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service, Special Assistant to the Assistant Administrator at EPA’s Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances, and science and technology advisor to the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry. Michael received a Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from the University of Chicago and his undergraduate degree in biology from Princeton University.

  • Break

  • CRISPR in the Wild: Environmental considerations for Gene Editing? CRISPR offers the potential to eliminate invasive rodents and malaria-carrying insects, improve environmental outcomes of food production, restore endangered species, and even bring back extinct species. Yet it raises concerns regarding undesirable and potentially permanent impacts to the environment and biodiversity. This panel will reflect a range of perspectives from the conservation community on environmental considerations for gene editing.

    Aroha Te Pareake Mead

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    Aroha Te Pareake Mead

    Independent Researcher

    Aroha Te Pareake Mead is from the Ngati Awa and Ngati Porou (Maori) tribes of Aotearoa New Zealand. She is Chair Emeritus of the IUCN Commission on Environmental, Economic and Social Policy (CEESP) and is currently working as an independent researcher. Aroha has worked at the intersection of indigenous knowledge, conservation and science for over 30 years, specialising in the impact of biotechnologies on indigenous peoples as well as on indigenous cultural and intellectual property issues. She has published extensively on these issues including co-editing the publication “Pacific Genes & Life Patents’.

    Ryan Phelan

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    Ryan Phelan

    Executive Director and Co-founder, Revive & Restore

    Ryan Phelan is Co-founder and Executive Director of Revive & Restore, with a mission to enhance biodiversity through the genetic rescue of endangered and extinct species. Ryan works with some of the world’s leading molecular biologists, conservation biologists, and conservation organizations to develop pioneering genetic rescue projects using cutting-edge genomic technologies to solve previously intractable wildlife conservation challengers such as those posed by inbreeding, exotic diseases, climate change, and destructive invasive species. She organized a landmark workshop on genetic rescue at the 2016 IUCN. World Conservation Congress, and acted as a principal investigator for the 2015 IUCN- and Rockefeller Foundation-sponsored Bellagio Conference on Biodiversity Conservation in the Context of Synthetic Biology.

    Ryan is a serial entrepreneur, active in both the for-profit and non- profit worlds. She was the founder and CEO of two innovative healthcare companies: DNA Direct, the first medical genetics company to focus on bringing personalized medicine to the consumer, and Direct Medical Knowledge, a consumer health web site unique for its content depth and innovative search interface. She currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Personal Genome Project, which aims to sequence and publicize the complete genomes and medical records of 100,000 volunteers, in order to enable research into personalized medicine.

    Simon Stuart

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    Simon N. Stuart PhD

    Conservation Director, Synchronicity Earth

    Simon is the Conservation Director at Synchronicity Earth, having recently retired as Chair of the Species Survival Commission (SSC) for the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Simon has undergraduate and doctoral degrees from the University of Cambridge, with fieldwork in Tanzania and Cameroon. He has over 25 years of experience with the IUCN and the SSC. Simon started work on the African Bird Red Data Book in 1983. He joined the IUCN Secretariat in 1986, and was Head of the Species Programme (1990-2000), Acting Director General (2000-2001), Head of the Biodiversity Assessment Unit (2001-2005), and Senior Species Scientist (2005-2008). He was elected as Chair of the SSC at the IUCN World Conservation Congress in Barcelona in October 2008. Simon has been instrumental in the species conservation movement, working on a number of global initiatives such as the Millennium Development Goals Biodiversity Target and the Convention on Biological Diversity. Simon has also produced numerous high impact reports and books. He joins Synchronicity Earth as the species advisor, chosen for his years of species conservation experience, his passion and his excellent network of global contacts.

    Jim Thomas

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    Jim Thomas

    Programme Director, ETC Group

    Jim Thomas is a researcher, writer and policy expert with ETC Group, an international Civil Society Group that tracks the impact of emerging technologies and corporate concentration on biodiversity, agriculture, and human rights.  Formerly with Greenpeace International and involved with grassroots environmental activism,  Jim has been analysing biotechnology issues for over two decades. Jim serves as a civil society representative to the UN Convention on Biological Diversity’s Ad Hoc Technical Expert Group on Synthetic Biology,  He was part of the European Unions SYNENERGENE project on Responsible Research and Innovation in Synthetic Biology and is founding convenor of the Synbiowatch collaborative – see www.synbiowatch.org.  He also tracks other emerging and converging technological domains including nanotechnology, geoengineering and big data.

    Moderator:

    Nathanael Johnson

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    Nathanael Johnson

    Senior Writer, Grist

    Nathanael Johnson is a Grist staff writer and the author of two books:  All Natural and Unseen City. He has written pieces for Harper’s, This American Life, and New York Magazine. He lives in Berkeley, California.

  • Lunch

  • Optional Breakout Session: FoodMinds Food Values Project™ salon A broad set of consumer food values is comprised of interrelated social, political, regulatory, agricultural and technological factors that are changing the way food is produced, distributed, marketed, regulated, sold and consumed. These values are emerging in different ways around the globe. To help CRISPR scientists and stakeholders better anticipate the issues and opportunities for gene editing, this facilitated dialogue will generate insights around food values that are impacting consumer food choices.

    Hosted by FoodMinds and Recombinetics, Inc.

  • Optional Breakout Session: Diversity, equity and inclusion in the CRISPR debate Applications of CRISPR have the potential to impact communities across the world – yet their debate is often limited to the so-called ivory towers. This facilitated dialogue will further explore key questions of equity: How can the debate over CRISPR most meaningfully engage underrepresented voices, those of the underserved, indigenous, remote and/or at-risk communities, and those that might be most affected by new gene editing technologies? What unique issues arise regarding equity, access and choice when considering diverse communities?

    Hosted by the Minority Coalition for Precision Medicine and the Personal Genetics Education Project (Harvard Medical School)

  • Whether and How: Who determines the future of CRISPR? Numerous voices and values will influence the future of CRISPR. National regulatory processes, international protocols and public perspectives will play a role in determining not only what technologies are available, but also whether they are accepted and utilized. CRISPR may even require new modes of engagement and decision-making. This panel will explore the roles of science and values in decision-making, as well as who gets to determine the future of CRISPR, and how.

    Carla Easter

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    Carla L. Easter, PhD

    Chief, Education and Community Involvement Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health

    Carla Easter is chief for the Education and Community Involvement Branch of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI).  She played a major role in the development of the NHGRI/Smithsonian exhibition – “Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code” and its accompanying website, and serves as a liaison to the public, K-12 and university communities as an advisor and speaker on genomic science and career preparation and pathways.  Dr. Easter has also served as an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Biology, Chemistry and Physics at the University of the District of Columbia.  From 2003-2006, she was director of outreach for Washington University School of Medicine’s Genome Sequencing Center. Before assuming her role as outreach director, Dr. Easter was a research associate in the Department of Education at Washington University (2001-2003) where she explored the notions of science among secondary students. She served as pre-college coordinator for the NASA Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Plus Program and project associate for the Quality Education for Minorities Network.  From 1997-2000, Dr. Easter conducted post-doctoral research at Washington University School of Medicine on the virulence factors associated with Streptococcus pyogenes. Dr. Easter earned her bachelor’s degree in Microbiology from the University of California, Los Angeles and her doctoral in Biology with an emphasis on Molecular Genetics from the University of California, San Diego.

    Donovan Guttieres

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    Donovan Guttieres

    Focal Point, Science-Policy Interface Platform, UN Major Group for Children and Youth

    Mr. Donovan Guttieres is Focal Point for the Science-Policy Interface Platform of the UN Major Group for Children & Youth (UN MGCY). He is a graduate student in the Technology Policy Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), conducting research on global access to biologic therapeutics in the Center for Biomedical Innovation within the Institute for Data, Systems, and Society. He holds a B.S in Biomedical Engineering from Boston University, with focus on global health technologies and applied public health. He is actively engaged with many groups on campus, such as the Science Policy Initiative at MIT, Engineers Without Borders, Global Poverty Initiative at MIT, and Biotechnology Group. His interest is on evidence-informed approaches to context-conscious, people-centered, and planet-sensitive applications of technology for sustainable development.

    Gregory Jaffe

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    Gregory Jaffe, J.D.

    Director, Project on Biotechnology, Center for Science in the Public Interest

    Gregory Jaffe is the Director of the Project on Biotechnology for the Center for Science in the Public Interest (“CSPI”), a non-profit consumer organization located in the United States.  He is a recognized international expert on agricultural biotechnology and biosafety and has published numerous articles and reports on those topics.  He was worked on biosafety regulatory issues in the United States and throughout the world.  He was a member of the Secretary of Agriculture’s Advisory Committee on Agricultural Biotechnology and 21st Century Agriculture from 2003-2008 and was reappointed for another term from 2011-2016.  Gregory Jaffe earned his BA with High Honors from Wesleyan University in Biology and Government and then received a law degree from Harvard Law School.

    Larisa Rudenko

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    Larisa Rudenko, PhD DABT

    Visiting Scholar, Program on Emerging Technologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Larisa Rudenko is currently a Visiting Scholar in the Program on Emerging Technology at MIT where she is studying science- and values-based concerns associated with emerging biotechnologies. She has been the Senior Advisor for Biotechnology at the Center for Veterinary Medicine for 15 years, where she led the agency initiative to develop its novel risk-based approach for the regulation of genetically engineered (GE) animals and created and directed new FDA administrative unit for the implementation of that program. She has worked in different venues to develop paradigms to assess the risk/safety of genetic alterations in multiple systems from microorganisms to plants to animals (including humans). Her “firsts” include developing a regulatory strategy for the first food from a genetically engineered plant; producing the first comprehensive assessment of the safety/risk of animal health and foods from animal clones; overseeing the first guidance for the regulation of GE animals; implementing that guidance by overseeing the processes for the first approval relevant to a genetically engineered biopharm animal; and overseeing the first approval relevant to a GE animal intended for food use. Dr. Rudenko has worked on developing seminal international policies for the assessment of risks of various types of genetic alterations and assisted reproductive technologies; she is internationally recognized for successful leadership and collegial collaboration in developing coordinated strategies and harmonized consensus documents. She has served as a judge and safety advisor to the iGEMs competitions. Prior to her tenure at FDA, Dr. Rudenko worked in the consultancy and venture capital fields. She received her PhD in Cellular and Molecular Biology from Stony Brook University after completing her doctoral work in DNA damage and repair at the Brookhaven National Laboratory; she is a Diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology.

    Moderator:

    Jennifer Kuzma

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    Jennifer Kuzma, Ph.D.

    Goodnight-NC GSK Foundation Distinguished Professor in School of Public and International Affairs and co-Director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, NC State University.

    Jennifer Kuzma is the Goodnight-NCGSK Foundation Distinguished Professor in the School of Public and International Affairs, and co-director of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, at NC State University.  Prior to this, she was associate professor of science and technology policy at the University of Minnesota (2003-2013); study director at the U.S. National Academies of Science (NAS) (1999-2003); and an AAAS Risk Policy Fellow at the USDA (1997-1999). She has over 100 scholarly publications on emerging technologies and governance and has been studying this area for over 25 years.   Kuzma currently serves on several national and international advisory boards, including the World Economic Forum’s Global Futures Council on Technology, Values, and Policy and the U.S. National Academy of Sciences Committee on Preparing for Future Biotechnology.  She has held several other leadership positions, including the Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) Council Member and Secretary, Chair of the Gordon Conference on Science & Technology Policy, Member of the US FDA Blood Products Advisory Committee, and a Member of the UN WHO-FAO Expert Group for Nanotechnologies in Food and Agriculture. In 2014, she received the SRA Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecturer Award for recognition of her outstanding contributions to the field of risk analysis and in 2017-2018 she was awarded the Fulbright Canada Research Chair in Science Policy at the University of Ottawa.  She is cited and interviewed frequently in the media for her expertise in biotechnology policy, including the New York Times, Science, Nature, NPR, Washington Post, Scientific American, The Boston Globe, PBS Nova, Wired, and ABC & NBC News.

  • Where to from Here?: Closing reflections on CRISPR, science, and society CRISPRcon 2017 is just the beginning. What have we learned and what should we bring back to our respective institutions, industries and communities? What are the next steps in the evolution of CRISPR and in the public dialogue around it? What is the individual obligation to carry the conversation forward? This closing panel will reflect on where we’ve been and where we should go in the discourse on CRISPR, science and society.

    This session will be livestreamed. Tune in via Twitter.

    James Corbett

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    James Corbett, M.Div, J.D.

    Senior Vice President of Community Health and Values Integration

    James Corbett is senior vice president of community health and values integration at Centura Health, a multi-state integrated health system and the region’s largest health care provider serving Colorado and western Kansas with 17 Hospitals and 22,000 employees.  Corbett was a 3 year fellow at Harvard Medical School Division of Medical Ethics and was appointed a four year term to the National Institutes of Health’s National Advisory Council for Nursing Research (NINR) by Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius.  Over the course of his career, he has worked in four different health systems providing strategic and operational leadership for clinical trials, research operations, ethics, behavioral health, community health, spiritual care, diversity, mission and global health. In these roles, he has established innovative programs to improve health care outcomes and reduce health care costs.  He has lectured at Harvard in Clinical Bioethics Courses and at the University of New England and Maine Schools of Law and has been published in numerous books and journals. Corbett received his B.S. in International Relations from Syracuse University, a Juris Doctor from St. Johns University and a Master of Divinity from Duke University.

    Andrea Crisanti

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    Professor Andrea Crisanti

    Professor of Molecular Parasitology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London; Professor of Clinical Microbiology, University of Perugia, Italy

    Andrea Crisanti is professor of molecular parasitology at Imperial College and Professor of Clinical Microbiology at the University of Perugia, Italy. He graduated in Medicine at the University of Rome “la Sapienza’, and carried his doctoral work at the Basel Institute for Immunology. After the doctorate he was awarded a three years EMBO fellowship at the University of Heidelberg, Germany. Thereafter he was employed as medical consultant at the University of Rome Institute of Parasitology. Prof. Crisanti has pioneered the molecular biology of the human malaria vector Anopheles gambiae and has made a number of important scientific contributions that advanced the genetic and molecular knowledge of the malaria parasite and its mosquito vector. More recently Prof. Crisanti has applied concepts of synthetic biology for the development of genetic vector control measures aimed at either eliminating wild type mosquito populations or at interfering with their ability to transmit malaria. This resulted in the development and validation of a CRISPR based genetic drive system capable of spreading, into wild type mosquitoes, mutations impairing female fertility genes.

    Claudia Emerson

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    Claudia Emerson

    Founding Director of the Institute on Ethics & Policy for Innovation, and Associate Professor of Philosophy, at McMaster University, Canada

    Claudia Emerson is the founding Director of the Institute on Ethics & Policy for Innovation, and Associate Professor of Philosophy, at McMaster University, Canada.

    Claudia’s work primarily addresses ethical issues and policy gaps in global health research, and she has been working with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and its partners for over a decade examining issues that arise along the discovery-to-delivery pathway for potential lifesaving interventions.  She is particularly interested in ethical issues related to data access and models of governance that facilitate data sharing, the introduction of novel technologies, and the management of infectious disease.

    Claudia serves in several advisory capacities related to public health, including the national Advisory Committee on Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues for the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging for the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), and the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) Expert Working Group on Field Testing of Modified Mosquitoes Driving Transgenes. She has advised the World Health Organization and other UN Agencies, and currently serves on the Scientific Committee of the International Council for Science (ICSU) World Data System.  She holds a B.Sc. in Biomedical Science from the University of Guelph, M.A. and Ph.D. in Philosophy from McMaster, and completed her Postdoctoral training at the University of Toronto.

    Neal Gutterson

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    Neal Gutterson

    Vice President, Research & Development
    DuPont Pioneer

    Neal Gutterson, Ph.D., is vice president, Research and Development (R&D), DuPont Pioneer, responsible for leading all R&D and product development functions to create innovative agricultural products, services and integrated solutions.

    Neal holds a Bachelor of Science in chemistry from Yale University and a doctorate in biochemistry from the University of California, Berkeley. He currently sits on the CIMMYT Board of Trustees where he is program committee chair. Neal is named inventor on more than 30 patents and pending patent applications.

    Rebecca Shaw

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    Rebecca Shaw

    Chief Scientist, World Wildlife Fund

    In her role as Chief Scientist, Dr. Rebecca Shaw works with experts and partners around the world to identify emerging challenges to WWF’s mission and advance the scientific inquiry to deliver solutions to those challenges.  Rebecca came to WWF from the Environmental Defense Fund, where she was responsible for developing and implementing the vision and strategy of the Ecosystems program. Rebecca has been published widely in leading peer-reviewed scientific journals such as Science and Nature and is the recipient of numerous awards for her work. She is a lead author on Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Fifth Assessment Report that focuses on impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Rebecca holds an M.A. in environmental policy and a Ph.D. in energy and resources from the University of California, Berkeley.

    Moderator:

    Michael Krasny

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    Michael Krasny

    Host, KQED FORUM, Professor of English, San Francisco State University

    Dr. Krasny is host of the award winning KQED FORUM, a program discussing news and public affairs, current events, culture, health, business and technology. FORUM can be heard daily on Northern California’s public radio station, KQED, as well as on Sirius/XM Satellite with National Public Radio, Comcast digital cable, and on the Internet as a podcast on iTunes. He has interviewed a wide range of major political and cultural figures. He is also a veteran interviewer for the nationally broadcast City Arts and Lectures series. Focus Magazine named him Best Bay Area Talk Show Host, and he was selected Best Talk Host and Best Interviewer by the editorial staff of San Francisco Weekly, as well as in their annual reader’s poll.

    Dr. Krasny’s abilities and reputation as one of the world’s finest interviewers are enhanced by his creative work as an author and educator. A former regular contributor to Mother Jones magazine, Dr. Krasny has published a great deal of fiction, literary criticism and political commentary. He is the author of Off Mike: A Memoir of Talk Radio and Literary Life (Stanford University Press) which was on both The San Francisco Chronicle and The Marin Independent Journal best-seller lists, Sound Ideas (with Maggie Sokolik McGraw-Hill) and Let There Be Laughter (Harper Collins). He also released a twenty-four lecture series DVD, audio and book on “Short Story Masterpieces” for The Teaching Company, and is the author of Spiritual Envy (New World Press), which was also on the best-seller lists in The San Francisco Chronicle and the Marin Independent Journal.

    A professor of English at San Francisco State University, he has been Visiting Professor at the University of San Francisco, Adjunct Professor at the University of California San Francisco and taught in Continuing Education at Stanford University, as well as being an Associate of the San Francisco Urban Institute. He coordinated the Nexa Dissemination Program in Science and Humanities under the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Carnegie Foundation, taught in the Fulbright Institutes for the National Fulbright Foundation, moderated the Future Forum on Global Impacts of Human Activity at the University of California, and was a Gelenter Lecturer at the University of California, San Francisco Department of Surgery. Michael conducted seminars at Esalen Institute, lectured to the San Francisco Psychoanalytic Institute and aboard the Royal Odyssey Cruise Line. In 2007, he was honored with an Award of Excellence from the National Association of Humanities Educators.

  • Adjourn

Planning Your Trip

The event will take place at Stanley Hall, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (corner of Gayley Road and University Drive). Please find a map here.

ACCOMMODATIONS

If you need a place to stay, there are a number of great hotels in the area to choose from. The following hotels are all about a 20-minute walk to the venue.

Bancroft Hotel
(Starting at $159/night)
2680 Bancroft Way, Berkeley
510/549-1000, 800/549-1002
bancrofthotel.com

Berkeley City Club
(Starting at $215/night)
2315 Durant Avenue, Berkeley
510/848-7800
berkeleycityclub.com

The Graduate Berkeley Hotel
($245/night using the link below)
2600 Durant Avenue, Berkeley
510/845-8981
Book Now (Discounted Rate)

Claremont Resort & Spa
(Starting at $379/night)
41 Tunnel Road, Berkeley
510/843-3000800/551-7266
claremontresort.com

AIR TRAVEL

If you plan to fly to Berkeley, we recommend flying into either the Oakland International Airport (OAK) or San Francisco International Airport (SFO).

OAK is about 15 miles from UC Berkeley (which is about 30 minutes by car or one hour on public transit, requiring a bus ride and then a transfer to BART, the Bay Area’s regional transit system). SFO is 25 miles from the Hotel Shattuck Plaza (which is about 50 minutes by car or one hour on public transit – a straight shot on BART with one transfer). At 50 miles from Berkeley, San Jose International Airport (SJC) is less convenient but may also be worth considering.

GROUND TRANSPORTATION

If you choose to drive or rent a car, there are several paid parking garages within walking distance of the hotel. We recommend the Stadium Parking Garage, located between the Cal Memorial Stadium, the Greek Theatre, and the Haas School of business. The rate is $4/hour, $15 for up to 10 hours and $25 for up to 24 hours. This map provides detailed information about other parking options.

The UC Berkeley Visitors’ Services web page also provides information about local public transit and campus parking, as well as driving directions to campus. Taxis, Lyfts, and Ubers are widely available in Berkeley.

STEERING COMMITTEE

CRISPRcon is being organized by a steering committee of individuals from the scientific community, industry and academia.  Program development has been facilitated by the Keystone Policy Center.

 

Axel Bouchon, Bayer

Melanie Cantarutti, UC Berkeley

James Corbett, Centura Health

Jennifer Doudna, UC Berkeley

Cassie Edgar, Genus

Sarah Evanega, Cornell Alliance for Science

Scott Fahrenkrug, Recombinetics

Michael Fernandez, GW Sustainability Collaborative

J. Keith Gilless, UC Berkeley

Neal Gutterson, DuPont Pioneer

Rachel Haurwitz, Caribou Biosciences, Inc.

Tim Hunt, Editas

Susan Jenkins, Innovative Genomics Institute

Kathleen Merrigan, George Washington University

Andrew Michael, Centura Health

Jeff Moen, Noble Research Institute, LLC

Tammy Lee Stanoch, Recombinetics

GLOSSARY

Looking to better understand terminology of CRISPR and gene editing? Check out the Innovative Genomics Institute’s Glossary.

SPONSORS

CONTACT US

For more information about CRISPRcon, please contact us:

CONTACT